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20

THE AURA AND THE HALO

by Meher Baba

 

An aura and a halo are two different things and people are unable to distinguish between the two. Few people know that an aura and a halo are quite different in their respective natures, despite their close interconnection. No man can ever possess both aura and halo completely developed at one and the same time.

 

Like their respective shadows, every man, woman, child and baby has an aura, but only a very few individuals have a halo in the varying phases of its development; and fewer still possess a full halo. An aura is the reflection of the emotions of an individual mind, just as any physical thing possesses its shadow on the physical plane. The halo begins to appear when the aura begins to disappear.

 

The difference between an aura — the mental reflection — and any physical shadow is tremendous. Shadows depend upon their physical forms, but an individual aura remains unaffected, even when the person concerned drops his physical body, because in spite of physical death, the individual continues to possess both a mind and the impressions in it, as well as a subtle body, which has a direct connection with its aura.

 

Every action, significant or insignificant, intentional or unintentional, on the part of any person, creates relative impressions (sanskaras), which gets imprinted on the mind of the individual, just as sound is preserved on a gramophone record and images of light and shade are caught on photographic plates. As thought is the first direct medium of expression of an impression, a deep connection is established between the thoughts and impressions of an individual.

 

An aura, therefore, is the mental reflection of the aggregate impressions of thoughts and actions, gathered by and stored in an individual mind. As long as the impressions arc there, an aura is always there, as an envelope of subtle atmosphere, comprised of seven colors, which remain more or less prominent according to the nature of each individual's impressions.

 

No two men are alike in all respects, and yet all have common physical features. Similarly, the aggregate of individual impressions differ from one another, both quantitatively and qualitatively, yet every aura is comprised of seven colors, common to all. These seven colors of an individual's aura represent the seven principal categories, corresponding to the aggregate impressions of each individual.

 

reprinted by special permission from “In Quest of Truth” by Irene Conybeare.

 

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