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14

 

"So as to avoid being cramped in the cars, the outings can be spread over three days, a certain number only going on each trip. This means some will be always at home and those not wishing to make use of their outings can remain quietly at home. Elizabeth will have two picnics each month if she drives the Ford herself."'

 

As often happens in daily life, when given the permission to do what heretofore had been forbidden, one ceases to care overmuch for the offered freedom, showing clearly it is the restriction you rebel against rather than the longing for what lies beyond; either that or one craves for still more freedom, unsatisfied with what one already has.

 

I can recall two occasions on which my group made use of their "outing privilege"; one was to Happy Valley. I am sure we enjoyed it. Adi Jr. told us a great deal about Baba's earlier life during these outings and this meant much to us. Elizabeth, Norina, Will and Mary, and perhaps one or two others chose to remain behind. Perhaps they felt that unless one went with Baba, where was the pleasure?

 

This would not be the first time after Baba had acquiesced in a request to "Leave the grounds," that we found that what we thought would be "clover," turned out to be something less!! And I think, deep down, even in these early days, we must have felt that Baba really preferred us not to want these outings. But we were not all wise!

 

March 1937. Well, we're all satisfied with this "Freedom with clipped wings"? Were we? Apparently not! The following reproof from Baba tells its own tale.

 

March 4. Baba said, "Very hard nuts to crack—all of you! Picnics are good, walking also; games too, like ping pong, and so forth, for exercise, but this does not mean going daily for a swim or hunting and killing tigers. Have you come to wanting to do such things because Rustom shot a tiger!!

 

"Take long or short walks, but don't make new suggestions. Read through the restrictions carefully and do as you are told. It is because I love you that I am saying this. (Turning to Margaret) You did not leave your school to poor Mabel for killing tigers!

 

“Picnics once a month are all right. I am very happy about that, but don't ask me for other privileges. This displeases me. If I did not like your going out picnicking I would not have said to Elizabeth 'When will you go? Why do you not go?’ And if every day you go out walking for miles or

 

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