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30

 

All the forms of meditation which are followed by the aspirant, as well as all the other spiritual efforts of his, have, in spite of their differences, only one aim, to speed up the fruition of his longing to be united with the Infinite. When this union is effected, the Sadhaka becomes a Siddha (one who has attained the Goal). The union with the Infinite which the Siddha achieves is referred to by the Sufis as "Vasl." It is this state of union with God which is described by Christ in the words: "I and my Father are one." Many have written about this highest state of consciousness; but it remains essentially indescribable. It cannot be expressed in words, and, therefore, it cannot be adequately explained. But, though it can never be explained by anyone to another, it can be experienced by everyone for himself. This highest state of the Siddha is called the state of Sahaj Samadhi.

 

To dwell in Sahaj Samadhi is to experience the God-state in which the soul knows itself to be God, because it has shed all the limiting factors which had hitherto contributed towards false self-knowledge, The God-state of the Siddha stands out in clear contrast with the body-state of the worldly man. The worldly man takes himself to be the body and dwells in the state which is dominated by the body and its wants. His consciousness is linked up with the body and centers round the body. He is concerned with eating, drinking, sleeping and the satisfaction of other bodily desires. It is for the body that he lives; and it is with the body that he seeks fulfillment. His consciousness cannot extend beyond the body; and when he thinks of anything, it is in terms of the body. He cannot think of anything which has no body or form. When he thinks of anything, there is always some reference to the form or body. The entire sphere of his existence is comprised of forms; and the theatre in which he lives and moves and has his being consists of space.

 

The first step towards the God-state of Sahaj Samadhi is taken when the body-state is transcended. The shedding of the body-state means entering the sphere of existence which is comprised of energy. The soul then dwells in the state which is no longer dominated by forms or bodies. It is lifted up to the domain of energy. Body or form is a sort of solidification of energy; and to rise from the world of forms to the sphere of energy amounts to an advance towards the more primary and purer state of being. The energy-state is free from many of the limitations which obtain in the world of forms. In this state, consciousness is linked up with energy and all the time vibrates in and through energy. In the energy-state, the eating and

 

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