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29

 

There is still another important difference between the trance-meditations of the aspirant and the Sahaj Samadhi of the Siddha. The trance-meditations of the aspirant are usually sustained by some phenomenal object, capable of exercising irresistible attraction. The lights, calm, tastes, smells and sounds of the subtle sphere have their own part to play in helping the mind to withdraw itself from worldly things, to which it may have been attached, and in alluring it into the lull of trance-meditation. Thus, the trance-meditation of the aspirant is not self-sustained; and it is mostly dependent upon the subtle object on which the mind fastens itself.

 

In contrast to this, the Sahaj Samadhi of the Siddha is self-sustained and in no way dependent upon any object of the mind. The trance-meditation of the aspirant is, in some respects, like the stupor of intoxicating drugs. The intoxication of the drug lasts only as long as the effect of the drug lasts; so, the trance continues to exist as long as the mind is under the sway of the object by which it is sustained. Sahaj Samadhi, which is free from the domination of the object, is, on the other hand, a state of full-wakefulness, in which there is no room for ebb and flow, waxing or waning, but which has the steadiness of true perception.

 

The different forms of general and specialized meditation resorted to by the aspirant are useful and valuable within their own limits. They must not be looked upon as having the same value for all or as being equally necessary to all. They are among the ways which lead the aspirant towards his divine destination. For the few who are in an advanced spiritual state, most of the ordinary forms of meditation are unnecessary. In the same way, for those who are in direct contact with a God-realized Master, many of the special forms of meditation often are not necessary. It is enough for them to be under the guidance of the Master, and to have love for him. And those rare beings who have attained Self-realization and are always in the state of Sahaj Samadhi, do not only not need any forms of meditation, but themselves become the object of meditation for the aspirants; for, they are then able to give their best help to those who meditate upon them.

 

 

The Ascent to Sahaj Samadhi and Its Nature

 

When the mind is rightly tuned to the object of meditation, it merges in the Truth and experiences Sahaj Samadhi or a state of spontaneous enjoyment of uninterrupted self-knowledge, in which the aspirant loses his limited individuality, to discover that he is identical with God, Who is in everything. The Sahaj Samadhi must be looked upon as a culmination of the earlier forms of personal and impersonal meditation and not as their product.

 

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