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18

 

Conclusion:

JOURNEY OF THE HEART

By Filis Frederick

 

 

 

Friday, August 3, 1956

 

We were on the plane to San Francisco for the last stage of our "journey of the heart" with Meher Baba. Los Angeles airport and its crowd of curious strangers had just been left behind. It was a beautiful sunny day . . . white clouds like cotton candy drifted past the windows of our plane. High above the world we sped with the "Awakener" in our midst. This morning, he was happy to be with his lovers, and as soon as we were airborne, he walked down the aisle to greet each of us lovingly, to inquire how we were, to give a touch or a glance to each of us. When he returned to his seat, there were short conferences with a few. Cameras were busy. Laughter resounded. Once, when I gave a loud sneeze, Baba gestured,  "You will bring down the whole plane!"

 

Arriving at San Francisco airport, the Master was inundated by a wave of tow-headed youngsters, one of whom garlanded him with bright yellow flowers. His blue coat, the yellow flowers, the yellow hair of the children all made an unforgettable picture. But it was very cold; Bili Eaton gave Baba her cloak. He wore it a moment, then gently returned it.

 

Separately we rode to the spot chosen for our stay in San Francisco: Holiday Lodge. Warren Healy, our dear and faraway Awakener publisher, drove me in Agnes Baron's station wagon. Holiday Lodge was a flowery oasis in the heart of downtown San Francisco. Three floors of tiered rooms and balconies surrounded a palm-shadowed pool.

 

But a crisis developed. Baba did not care for the rooms chosen for him, a duplex apartment far from the central court. It was too far from his lovers, and they were not connecting rooms. But none were to be had until tomorrow! Other hotels were suggested, homes were offered. Those responsible for the arrangements were getting upset. It was Baba's well-known test of patience. He said to Ivy, "This is the way I work."

 

Baba told Lud: "Everywhere else the arrangements were perfect. My requirements are simple—just two connecting rooms. But it isn't only the rooms. I just don't like the place. So I will leave San Francisco Sunday morning, two days early.''

 

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