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of thought and feeling—indeed, a more profound frame of reference—which can be realized outside the pale of the church and beyond the periphery of organizational activity.

 

Only such a wider and deeper perspective, resting on the firm foundation of an abiding faith and a transcendent, radiant, LOVE, permits the full freedom of self-expression and the soul-unfoldment of the individual aspirant on the path of illumination. In Baba's words, "Where there is LOVE, there is Oneness."

 

Let us identify ourselves, then, on the basis of our collective, generic, similarities instead of our particular differences which are after all insignificant and almost entirely irrelevant. Let this identification be:

 

FIRST, as "Members of the Human Family." For as we look around, do we not see people of various races, creeds, and colors, and from all walks of life, apparently equally enjoying the blessings of life and living—and yet who are all human beings? This infinite and immeasurable variety indicates these differences. Yet each unit and each individual is an integral part of the great cosmographic unison which we call "The Human Family" and which is probably the supreme of God's creations. Mankind is the highest of the four major kingdoms in the material, phenomenal universe. In the eyes of God there is but one race—the human race.

 

SECOND, as "Citizens of the Universe." For do these people not live in the same universe, both manifest and unmanifest? Do they not breathe the same air, eat the same kind of food, enjoy similar cultures, etc., and even worship the same God, but in diverse ways? Yet all are subject to the same universal laws and all are instruments for the expression of cosmic energy. All bear witness to the creative wonders of God's universe.

 

THIRD, as "Children of God." For were we not created supposedly in God's likeness and by the same God—the great creative principle that gave us life—the all-embracing power that governs the universe and all life within it, the "Ineffable Name" that has been labeled in many ways, but yet remains immutable and ever changeless as the all-knowing, all-powerful, ever-present, and forever active, Infinite Being—the Absolute—that is perhaps the only causeless cause? Do not all religions and creeds claim there is but one God and, notwithstanding the different names used to designate the deity, that it is the same God for all of us? For in a deeper sense we are all part and parcel of the divine essence, functioning in varying degrees of

 

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