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31

 

Meher Baba’s Work
and Our Work

 

 

 

A talk by C. B. Purdom at a meeting of
the Friends of Meher Baba in London,
on 28 April 1965

 

 

 

The last brief chapter of 'The God-Man' is devoted to what Meher Baba calls His 'Work', or more comprehensively His 'universal work'. It is a short chapter because, although the 'Work' is without doubt of first importance, it cannot easily be described.

 

Meher Baba's activities have been prodigious; there is His work with mandali, the work among boys, among the poor, the mast work, the world travels, what He called man-o-nash, the darshans and sahavas, His personal contacts, and what He termed 'the infinitely crucial phase of My work,’ which, he said, had been completed on 28th October 1959, which, in a message on 9th December that year, He 'said' could be compared to the amassing and arranging in a universal heap the accumulated rubbish of man's ignorance in illusion that enmeshes him in the false and prevents him from realizing his true identity. Indeed it has to be agreed that Meher Baba's silence is deepest about His work. We are not to know what it is, and ambiguity is always present. He has said very distinctly that it is His own work, which He does Himself, in which no one is required to partake: 'I alone do My work', He said to those who had gathered in His presence from all over the world in November 1962.

 

The best we can do, therefore, is to meditate upon the idea of that 'Work', to observe Baba, to ask ourselves what it may be, realizing that is beyond our comprehension, which is what I propose in this talk. You will understand that what I say are no more than tentative conclusions: arrived at after long reflection, and that I do not speak with any special knowledge and certainly without dogmatism.

 

In the first place I invite you to note that the mystery of Meher Baba's work is akin to the mystery of the work of Jesus Christ. There can be no doubt from reading the Gospels that the work of Jesus was much more than his 'preaching', his teaching of disciples, his works of healing, and so forth. Apart from a few references in St. John the word itself is not to be found, for ‘works’ mean the works of healing. Nothing is more certain from the three Synoptic Gospels than that the inner circle of Jesus, his closest disciples, had no idea what his work was.

 

St. John's Gospel, which is a work of interpretation, describes Jesus speaking to a Samaritan woman, and afterwards explaining to his perplexed disciples, 'It is meat and drink for me to do the will of him that sent me until I have finished his work'. This implies that his talking to the woman was 'God's Work'. In the same Gospel we read of the man who had been blind from birth, and Jesus saying 'He sent me to do his work', after which he put a spittle of clay upon the man's eyes and he afterwards could see. 'I am the light of the world', said

 

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