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4

 

are contagious!" I don't recall where I got this story but it was from someone who was present.

 

So Babajan just beckoned to that most famous Parsi lady and gave her the prasad. She wanted to put it away in her bag, you see, to sort of make believe she was going to eat it, but Babajan made her eat it in front of her.

 

Baba always used to say "You obey in big things, but in small things you won't listen, for small things you fail and big things you might do for Me." Babajan saw that this lady thought "I hope I won't get this dirty sweet, this contagious sweet to eat." But luckily she did eat it because it would have been very bad. If you don't take prasad from a Master it's the worst you can do.

 

If you like I'll read the story of how Baba went to a secluded place, Fallenfluh, Switzerland, in 1934. I don't know how many people know of that very important place. Afterwards I would like to tell how flabbergasted the German high military command were when they couldn't take Switzerland. Now, I’ll read this translation of Hedi's diary about Baba's stay on the Fallenfluh. First, I've a map here. Fallenfluh is almost in the center of Switzerland, on a mountain that goes straight down like this in front; it's a very exposed place, but it's also explained in here:

 

(Reads) "Baba had announced His visit to Switzerland. and asked us to find a quiet place where He could pass a day in seclusion. It should be free and exposed. With the help of a friend from Central Switzerland, the writer Meinrad Inglin from Schwyz in Central Switzerland, we hoped to have found the right place. Baba visited it, the first day of His arrival, the 7th July 1934, and accepted it. The house was full to the top, with Baba and His mandali, and English, American, French and Italian devotees. Those that didn’t find a place had to stay in the neighborhood. In the course of the following days Baba explained that He had intended to hold a meeting with advanced souls; His mandali should come with Him and all the women had to stay at home. The usual preparations were made, — tents, provisions and so on. The house and all its guests seem to participate. Seeing the huge, always growing heap of luggage, I asked myself how can all that be put in the car, but it was nothing to what he had when travelling in India. (You do remember, Kitty, all the luggage?)

 

"We were all called to Baba in the evening, who gave directions for the next day, and I had to drive because the hand of my husband had become seriously ill during the day. We started early in the morning; we had a big car, but it had to take up Baba, four mandali, and my husband and myself and of course all the luggage. I don't know how, but fortunately all found a place. We went down a steep slope to start, but we hadn't started without putting all responsibility on Baba. We went along the lake of Zurich for half an hour; all still quiet, almost no people on the road, passing village after village. Baba wanted me to drive quickly so I did. Before starting I had adjusted my back mirror so I could see Baba's face. He was seated in the back between two mandali, He had His head deeply wrapped up in a big shawl, His face all in the shade. For a long moment I couldn't look away. Though I kept the wheel in my hands, I felt my own action was slipping off, and we were driving as if on a cushion; the wheels scarcely touched the ground. I was keeping my eyes always fixed on Baba in the mirror. I saw His face. (Imagine driving with the face — don't know how she drove!) I saw His face getting warmer and at that same time I was strongly drawn to the wheel (where Baba pushed her to look where she was driving!).

 

"We had crossed a bad road across the lake of Zurich, with holes all over, and I tried to drive very carefully. Again, I saw Baba's face very clear and radiant. Then I felt as if I were discharged from a circle and I was driving very easily.

 

"Thus carefully and slowly we arrived at the mountains. Now we had to climb a very narrow mountain road where they drove the cattle to the high meadows. The road was fenced in on both sides and partitioned with wooden gates, so we had to stop again and again to open and shut the gates. The weather was splendid, the world on holiday, and the narrow road required my whole attention; I had to concentrate on it, at the same

 

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