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25

 

gave her: "Jean is not the body, Jean is soul." The reward of many deep inner experiences of the Master perhaps made up for her physical weakness.

 

Her background in metaphysics and Jungian analysis stood her in good stead. She could understand how Baba brought up the "shadow" side of His disciples in their clashes and moods. She and Malcolm were invited to Nasik to join one of two Western couples. It is hard enough to follow the spiritual path alone, but to walk it in tandem is doubly difficult. For example when Baba worked on Malcolm’s ego — often through his importance as a writer — He worked on Jean’s as well, and vice versa.

 

Also the harsh climate of India was hard on her health. But Baba showed her special tenderness; once, visiting a Buddhist temple with steep stairs, He ordered her to be carried up and down. Another time, she was on a diet of watermelon juice (probably her own — she was tremendous on diets) and Baba procured it for her. Jean and Malcolm were in the "meditation" group as opposed to light-hearted "Kimco". Baba used these temperamental differences — even clashes — of opinion, for His work. And one does suspect, for His own amusement sometimes.

 

When the Westerners returned to America, Malcolm and Jean separated amicably. Malcolm went on with his poetry and his meditation group in Hollywood. Jean took up writing also, publishing her biography of Baba, Avatar, in 1947. Charles Purdom had written a biography, The Perfect Master in 1937. But hers was more personal, more intimate, more feminine, if you will. She was criticized for revealing some of her occult experiences.

 

Like Norina, she had many such, and in an effort to understand had studied the metaphysics of her time. The biggest influence in those days was Theosophy and its many variations. Mme. Blavatsky had popularized a watered-down version of Eastern thought in the West. It was heavy on "ascended Masters," for example ― supposedly in Tibet. Once asked about Tibetan Masters, Baba said "In Tibet there’s nothing but wind and stones." Of course, one must make allowances for Baba's sense of humor. When Jean asked about Masters, Baba said "Masters, masters! I am your God."

 

In writing her book Avatar Jean queried Baba about mentioning Mehera. At that time she and "the girls" were kept from the public eye in every way. I recall in Norina’s home I wasn't even allowed to have a picture of Mehera displayed publicly. Baba answered Jean, no. But then, when the book came out, He cabled her asking why she didn’t mention Mehera, that she was the one He loved the most. As I said before, Baba used Mehera as a test for His women disciples. Most soon accepted the fact of Baba’s living female counterpart, the ultimate role model, but a role only one "chosen one" can play. It apparently was harder for Jean and this reversal of Baba's wish, about mentioning Mehera, was a turning point in her relationship to Baba, so she told me. It was then she began to drift away from Him and towards an "inner Master" — one of Theosophy’s "ascended Masters."

 

She also went to Sant Kirpal Singh, who at that time was traveling in the West giving initiation "with experiences". Baba said Kirpal Singh was a genuine saint and one of His "five favorites" and that he was on the fifth plane. There was quite a correspondence between Kirpal Singh and Baba. Kirpal Singh asked Baba why He didn’t give His disciples experiences. Baba replied, "What's the use of experiences — when I give, I give all." At another time Singh had asked Baba where he was, if he was God-Realized. As Baba explains in God Speaks, one may have such overwhelming experiences on the planes, that one believes one is "already there." But only a Perfect Master or Avatar can truly know. It was at this time we all received a warning not to go to saints, but to stick only to Baba.

 

It was in the Forties that Jean Adriel together with her friend the movie producer Alexander Markey, found the mountain property at Ojai, California, which they christened Meher Mount. Through her book and other contacts in the area many were drawn to visit there. It is a lovely property of about 180 acres so high one can see the Pacific. Some lovers gathered together there to follow the 30-day silence and partial

 

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