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10

 

It was most significant that in spite of heavy rains, Baba was not a wee bit wet, though the water had collected in pools all around the spot where he was sitting in seclusion. We had lighted a fire to make him warm, supposing that when he returned he would be quite wet due to the rain, but to our surprise we found that he was quite dry, absolutely unaffected by rains. And when asked how he happened to remain unaffected by rain, he smiled a significant smile which only those who are in his closer contact for years understand.

 

We broke fast and had a little food (fruits only) at 5:15 P.M. distributed by Baba himself.

 

While returning we took a wrong path, as our guide had left us in the morning, and came face to face with two good souls who had the opportunity to talk to Walter, explaining about the short cuts and turnings leading to the main road, while Baba stood opposite listening. Heidi brought the car five minutes after we were on the road, and we drove by another way this time purposely for Baba's work. Before starting for our destination, we had had coffee in a restaurant which was full of merriment, music and dancing. We had a very entertaining time there in contrast to the lonely hours passed in the course of the day while high up in the mountains. Despite the gaiety the atmosphere was marked by cleanliness and simplicity of the merrymaking folk which made it all the more lovely. Otherwise, Baba would not have stepped into the restaurant.

 

Adi and Chanji narrowly escaped getting burned from the scalding water spouting on the radiator of the car when they opened the cap to put in some more water.

 

The drive home took two hours (7:15 to 9:15). Rain was pouring heavily all the while. Baba was feeling tired, seemingly, after hours of hard, spiritual work. Enroute we passed the famous monastery and great Church of the Black Madonna at Einseideln, where thousands of Catholics go on a pilgrimage every year to have their desires granted and the sick folks healed. On a narrow road we encountered a herdsman driving his sheep, numbering hundreds, who would not give way and resented bitterly the blowing of the horn. His obstinacy was almost intolerable. An average person at the wheel under such provocation would have been in a temper, but Baba patted Heidi several times saying not to worry. Heidi had to follow the herd for nearly half an hour, and kept marvelously cool. Perhaps Baba wanted the shepherd to keep his company and teach Heidi and Walter a lesson in tolerance and forbearance.

 

Heidi told Baba in the car about her maid Theresa's wonderful experiences, and also reported that Pascal had fasted as Baba did not take anything.

 

Kaka had been on watch duty only a hundred yards away from Baba. He reported that when everything was arranged for his sitting in seclusion that Baba took off his English dress, and put on his Sadra (a long, thin, muslin covering which he puts on in India), and covering his body with two white sheets from head to foot, he lay down. He was changing his positions at intervals. At about 12:30 he signed to Kaka to come nearer, and sit at a distance of about 50 yards. It may be noted that Baba also adopted a sitting pose in his working, but was all the while covered up from head to foot, with two white sheets and a mosquito net. Baba got up at 4:30 and resumed his English dress.

 

During his watch, at about 10:30, Kaka felt a little drowsy, and in that state he felt somebody sitting by his side and whispering, "Are you . . ." (the last word he did not remember). Instantaneously, he opened his eyes, but found nobody around. Kaka felt instinctively that it could be no other than Baba himself. At about 3 P.M., when Kaka closed his eyes for a moment, he heard the voice of a lady whispering "Good night ", but when he opened his eyes he could not see anybody.

 

July 13th: This was a day specially fixed for visitors whom Baba saw individually between 9 and 11 in the morning and 3 and 5 in the afternoon. About 50 came today, most of them from Zurich, men and women in different professions, and walks of life, desirous of seeing him and asking for his grace and guidance in various problems both

 

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