Previous Page
Table Of Contents
Next Page

 

2

 

"That is your opinion, I conclude," the newsman said, but Baba looked straight at me and smiled whilst his fingers traced out on the cardboard, "My son, I have no opinion to offer, I KNOW."

 

On the life in the Nasik Ashram, as the reporter saw it, he wrote: " . . . the retreat of Meher Baba is more comfortable than many pretentious hotels in India. Hot and cold water in every room, bathrooms attached to each of them, feather and spring mattresses, comfortable cushions and carpets on the floor." And further: "Meher Baba does not want the most devoted of his devotees to renounce the world, to abstract themselves from earthly duties or to avoid the most humdrum of daily tasks. Do your work better than you do now. ‘You can,' he says, 'if you are compelled by a love of God. You can enjoy the big or small luxuries that come your way, only do not get attached to them. Do not let the smallest luxury become a habit.'"

 

Two of the most interesting excursions that Baba planned for us while in Nasik, were to Trimbak and to the Pandolina Caves—both places possessing tremendous spiritual heritage, hence places of pilgrimage. This visit to Trimbak, with Baba, I wrote about in the 1955 Awakener. The visit with Baba to the 22 Pandolina Caves, Elizabeth Patterson wrote up fully in the Meher Journal in 1938. Elizabeth suggests that as this present article is concerned foremost with our early training in discipleship, a stage of a "becoming" for all who would be disciples, that it would be more interesting to tell briefly, from her account, of the "Arangaon Dispute" to which Baba took her when we were staying in Meherabad, after our Nasik stay.

 

 

Arangaon Dispute

 

A quarter mile from "Meherabad" is the little village of Arangaon with its 400 inhabitants. Several hundred years ago, in the time of the brave Mohammedan Queen Chandbibi, the little village had importance along with the town of Ahmednagar, 8 miles NE., whose great Fort was constructed by Chandbibi. Today, there are interesting relics still to be seen of its past grandeur, although the village itself is crumbling and poor.

 

Since a long time, there was in this village, as often in other small places, an ancient feud which resulted in the inhabitants taking sides, and forming two parties. On Baba's birthday, and on other occasions, as you all have read in the "Awakener," the villagers come to see Baba and they invite him

 

Previous Page
Table Of Contents
Next Page