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35

 

May 19th:—In the morning the talk drifted to last night's dinner given by Andhra lovers. I told Baba that many subjects had been discussed including the one as to why He kept postponing the date of breaking His Silence. I said that it was immaterial for Baba lovers if Baba kept on postponing the date, but when other people ask us the reason it is not easy to convince them. Baba replied, “I shall positively break my Silence after nine months."

 

A lover from Karachi arrived with her son and embraced Baba. She said that after they had returned to Karachi from the East-West Sahavas last November, her son fell very ill. His Senior Cambridge examination was to start and he could not attend the first two papers. The Zoroastrian Parsee disbelievers of Baba in Karachi told her that she should not have gone for Baba's Sahavas when her son's examination was so near. Doctors reluctantly permitted her son to attend the examination after the second day. All expected that the boy would surely fail and were waiting for the date of the results when they could again taunt the boy's parents regarding Baba. The results astounded everyone. The son passed First Class and was the only Parsee in Karachi to get a First Class grade! He had taken eight subjects for the examination whereas only six were compulsory, so it was not impossible to pass although he did not appear for the papers on the first two days!

 

The assembly hall was full of lovers from Andhra. Baba asked K. S. of Andhra to summarize and tell everyone what Baba had said regarding the carrying out of work in Andhra. After this, Mr. M. Y. Mohan "Saigal" of Bombay, who had sung before Baba this summer, gave a wonderful feast of ghazals. Baba enjoyed the ghazals for two hours. Once Baba sent him out for tea. While he was away, a blind violinist from Andhra played on his violin and then on a flute. Baba, while explaining a few lines of the ghazals, said, "The lover says that his Beloved's eyebrows are like bows, while His Nazar (sight) is like an arrow. The lover asks his Beloved to shoot such an arrow that it would go deep down into his heart.

 

"The lover's weeping for the Beloved is so intense, that there are waves of tears, a regular storm so to say. He cries out that he does not know where his love will lead him. He says: 'I live; why? To die for you. Again, dying for you is nothing, for I have staked my life for you.'

 

"The lover says, 'Even my enemies cannot bear the sight of my suffering for you, 0 Beloved'!"

 

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