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28

 

Malcolm backed up by Jean, it was something! Poor Garrett, belonging to Hollywood with its emphasis on flare and advertisement, could hardly be expected to see eye to eye with Malcolm, whose life had been spent in metaphysical books and philosophy.

 

Baba, of course, was called in for numerous discussions. I think, up to a point, he enjoyed the mounting tensions, changing moods and high-pitched voices with the "common" personal epithets, not of the kindest, flying back and forth as sparks from an anvil. What does Baba do? He suppresses nothing—lets each have their full say—then dismisses all.

 

Two or three hours later, when presumably some of the excitement has boiled down, the parties are recalled. Baba takes over—finds good points on both sides and eventually brings about a compromise. Not until both parties are ready to shake hands, embrace and be friends again does Baba dismiss all. How did Baba spend a part of his time with us? You have the answer.

 

Norina, let it be said here, in voicing her opinion, later contributed greatly to the popularity of the Journal when she made it a condition that Baba should contribute a Discourse to each monthly issue. Our thanks!

 

So, in all, we represented a variety of interests. No one was idle. Baba gave each what he or she would enjoy and do with interest and enthusiasm. He added his own enthusiasm in the interest and time he personally gave to each, offering suggestions, and so forth. You cannot be in Baba's presence before realizing how important an attribute enthusiasm is in Baba's Way of Life—it keeps away despondency and negativeness and creates cheerfulness and energy.

 

But this in itself was not enough. What Baba wanted at the moment was harmony. Baba had to change "the orbit of disharmony, with self at its center, to an orbit of harmony with God as Center" . . . Baba would say, would he not, "A more difficult task than creation—to turn a selfish person into an unselfish one—stubbornness into flexibility."

 

It was only natural, I suppose, that some were inclined to think their task more spiritual than another’s, differentiating between the lofty and the so-called petty. But in Baba's ashrams none, in the long run, escaped.I recall being lectured one evening by one of the group who felt someone

 

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