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27

 

On the other hand, the Spiritual Infinity of the Truth has room for the paradox that one person can he regarded as the totality itself; therefore, one person is not only capable of being looked upon as equal in importance to two or more persons, but even as equal to all.

 

In Spiritual Infinity all comparison is out of place; these is no smaller or greater, no hierarchy of claims, privileges and rights; and evaluation remains unclouded because of the unmarred perception of the One in each and all. Since everyone in the creation not only is in the Spiritual Infinity but actually is that Infinity, everyone is first in importance and no one second.

 

In social life, the recognition of the Spiritual Infinity of the Truth will mean a challenge to individualism as well as to collectivism; it initiates a new way of thinking in terms of an indivisible totality, and it discards all the relative values of comparison in favor of the recognition of the intrinsic worth of everything.

 

In a civilization based upon a true idea of the Spiritual Infinity of the Truth, there will be therefore no problems of majority and minority, of rivalry and competition, and of those comparison and laborious assessments which so often become a shelter of pride and separative ego. Life then will be infinitely simple and integral, because the illusions which create rifts and complexities will all have disappeared.

 

 

MAN AND MAYA
By Irene H. Conybeare

 

In this article we discuss Maya or the Cosmic Illusion, and its implications and relations to man. If we read Explorations in Science, that brilliant digest of recent scientific achievements, by Waldemar Kaomffert, the science editor of the New York Times, we notice the increasing uncertainty of scientists as they probe further into the unknown. In one significant paragraph the author writes: "The Bohr-Dirac-Heisenberg school of scientists studied equations that were supposed to reveal the secrets of the atom and hence of Reality, only to find that Reality had vanished and that trees and stars were not what they seemed to be but only indications or 'pointer findings' to a deeper something that was real, something that science could never reach." The author goes on to ask, "Is it just a coincidence that the same uncertainty prevails in art, economics, and international relations?"

 

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