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8

 

stretch of land in delightful surroundings. It was on one side of the extensive lawn of a restaurant with artistic cement seats all around by the artificial lake adjacent to the boat club. Right across the lake was the colorful Philips pavilion which played the "musical dancing waters" to melodious tunes. Thousands of people of all nationalities, castes, colors and creeds came to the spot, some to have a snack in the nearby restaurant, some to enjoy a boat ride, some to watch the dancing waters and others just to rest their tired feet. One and all were drawn by the beautiful face of Baba looking down from the large photos crowding the stall giving them His "darshan," and as if beckoning to them to come and see something of their "self," having seen enough of the "stone" and "metal." So they came asking a variety of questions: Who is Meher Baba? Is He alive? Who is an Avatar? Where does He stay? Why is He in seclusion? Why doesn't He speak? What is His message? What is His religion? Is He Indian? Where can we have His darshan?

 

Some came, looked and listened and walked away skeptically with a smirk on their faces; some listened intently, picked up a pamphlet or two and went away wondering about the relation between God, man and machine, and others felt happy and stood listening, wanting to know more. So Baba's work was being done, and evidently we were only His instruments, mere pawns on His universal chessboard.

 

The Proposal

In New Delhi brisk preparations were taking place for the inauguration of the fair by the middle of November, 1961, the biggest in the East, in which many foreign countries participated. In the first week of November some of the lovers in the Avatar Meher Baba Delhi Center were discussing the fair. One of them, Sister Kusum Mohkam Singh, casually mentioned that her husband, who was building a few pavilions, could easily procure a free corner in one of the pavilions to display her "Meher Jyoti" hair oil. The idea caught on and there was another suggestion that it was a good idea to display a few of Baba's books and pamphlets along with the hair oil. I personally felt that the suggestion to display Baba's books in the Industries Fair, though a bit odd, was a good one. But I felt that displaying them with the hair oil in some industrial pavilion would subvert our main purpose, as people would take it as a publicity stunt to popularize one's own product under the guise of some spiritual literature. Various arguments and counter arguments were put forward and it was decided to write to Adi K. Irani, Baba's secretary, about our proposal and get his

 

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