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and pains; but, in the state of knowledge, he knows himself as the Soul, which is not in any way limited by these things and which is untouched by them. Once he knows his own true nature, he knows it for good and does not get involved any more in ignorance. This state of God-consciousness is infinite in every respect; and it is characterized by unlimited understanding, purity, love and happiness. To be initiated in Sahaj Samadhi is to arrive at the endlessness of the life in Eternity.

 

Sahaj Samadhi has thus two forms: (1) Nirvana or absorption in Divinity, and (2) Nirvikalpa State, or Divinity in expression. When the consciousness is withdrawn entirely from all the bodies and the world of creation, it leads to Nirvana or the Beyond State. But when consciousness is again made to function through the bodies, without attachment or identification, it leads to Nirvikalpa Samadhi or the Sadguru-State, in which, though consciousness is attached to the bodies as instruments, it is detached from them inwardly by non-identification. The piercing of the mind amounts to the complete withdrawal of consciousness from the universe and its total absorption in God. This is the state where the universe becomes zero; this is Nirvana. Most persons who attain Nirvana never come back again to the consciousness of the universe. Those few who descend to the consciousness of the universe, also experience it as nothing but God, and remain constantly in the Nirvikalpa State. Nirvikalpa State means a life wherein the mental activity of false imagination has come to an end, and where the oscillations of the limited mind are all stilled in the discovery of the unchangeable Truth.

 

The Sahaj Samadhi of the Nirvikalpa State comes to the souls who descend from the Seventh Plane. It belongs to the Sadgurus and the Avatars. The poise and harmony of this state remains undisturbed even while giving energetic response to the changing circumstances of life. He, who has this state, sees God everywhere and in everything; and he sees nothing but God. His God-state is, therefore, in no way toned down while dealing with the mundane things of this world. While drawing the bow or using the sword in the battlefield, while flying in the airplane or talking to people, or while he is engaged in other activities which require the closest of attention, he is still, every moment of his life, in the conscious enjoyment of the immutable Truth.

 

The Nirvana State and Nirvikalpa State are like the state of Mukti or Moksha, in representing the merging of the individual soul in God and in

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