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19

 

aware of the spiritual perfection of the Master and spontaneously fixes upon the form of the Master, without analyzing his spiritual perfection in any of its component qualities. However, though these qualities are not separately revived in the mind, all that the aspirant may have understood of them (through the preparatory meditation concerned with the diverse qualities of the Master), constitutes the implicit background of such one-pointed concentration and contributes towards its efficacy and value. The form of meditation involves complete identification of the Master with the spiritual ideal.

 

Such complete identification is responsible for removing barriers that might exist between the aspirant and the Master. This gives rise to the release of unrestrained love for the Master and leads to the meditation of the heart,* which consists in constant thinking about the Master with uninterrupted flow of limitless love. Such love annihilates the illusion of separateness, which seems to divide the aspirant from the Master; and it has in it spontaneity, which is hardly paralleled by other forms of meditation. Meditation of the heart, is, in its final stages, accompanied by unbounded joy and utter forgetfulness of the self.

 

Love for the Master leads to increasing identification of the aspirant with the Master, so that the aspirant desires to live in and for the Master and not for his own narrow self; and, this leads to the Meditation of action.** The initial modes of the meditation of action usually take the following forms. (a) The aspirant mentally offers to the Master all that is in him, thus renouncing all that is good in him as well as all that is evil in him; this frees him from the good as well as the bad ingredients of the ego and helps him, not only in transcending these opposites, but also in finding a lasting and true integration of being in the Master. (b) The aspirant volunteers himself in the service of the Master or his cause. Doing work for the Master in the spirit of selfless service is as good as meditation. (c) The aspirant does not allow the ego to feed upon any of his actions — small or great, good or bad. He does not think "I do this"; but, on the contrary, he systematically develops the thought that through him the Master is really doing all that he does. For example, when he looks, he thinks, “The Master is looking"; when he eats, he thinks, "The Master is eating"; when he sleeps, he thinks, "The Master is sleeping"; when he drives a car, he

 

*Meditation No. 1 in the Table.

* *Meditation No. 2 in the Table.

 

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