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into play; this could be called "discriminative" meditation. In the second type of meditation, the heart is predominantly brought into play, this could be called the "meditation of the heart." In the third type of meditation, the active nature of man is predominantly brought into play; it could be called the "meditation of action." Discriminative meditation is represented by the intellectual assertion of a formula like "I am not my body but the Infinite"; the meditation of the heart is represented by a steady and unhampered flow of love from the aspirant to the Divine Beloved; and the meditation of action is represented by an unreserved dedication of one's life to the selfless service of the Master or humanity. Of these three types of meditation, meditation of the heart is the highest and most important, but the other two types of meditation also have their own value and cannot afford to be neglected without serious detriment to spiritual progress.

 

In fact, the different types of meditation must not be looked upon as being entirety exclusive of each other. They can proceed in all sorts of combinations. Sometimes, one type of meditation inevitably leads to another type of meditation; and progress in one type of meditation is often held up until there is corresponding progress in the other types of meditation. All the different types of meditation are valuable for securing the spiritual advancement of the aspirant. They almost always make up for mutual deficiencies and supplement each other.

 

But one type of meditation may also seriously interfere with the progress of another type of meditation, if it is resorted to at an inopportune moment. The different types of genuine meditation all dwell upon aspects of life which are equally true. But, relative to the psychic state of the individual the assimilation of a certain truth of life is often more urgently necessary than the assimilation of some other truths of life. Therefore, the Masters never prescribe the same form of meditation to all; but they give specific instructions, according to the individual needs of the aspirant.

 

The type of meditation which is necessary in a particular situation, often cannot be correctly ascertained by the aspirant for himself. The aspirant can get addicted to one type of meditation so exclusively that he finds it difficult to get out of the groove which has been cut into his mind by the type of meditation which he has been practicing. He fails to see the importance of any other type of meditation and is not drawn by it. The aspirant may, of course, himself come to feel his own deficiency along a particular line. But just as many medicines are disagreeable to the patient, the types of meditation which are really indicated in a specific situation, often

 

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