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37

 

for Baba, talking of him with such love and showing us albums of photographs of him. Later I remember Kitty taking a little starched and scrubbed colored girl across the bridge telling her that there were baby rabbits she might play with."

 

 

 

I would like to tell you of one other incident in connection with this "Open Day." Baba has always been rather strict about keeping to any days or times he may set for giving interviews. All must come on the appointed days or lose their chance of seeing Baba. In this instance I am about to relate there was a misunderstanding about the dates as they had been changed; and four ballet dancers, not aware of the change, had wired to say they would be arriving on the 18th as before arranged. Margaret asked Baba—who previously said he would see no one after the open day on the 17th, whether he would see them if they came. Baba was always "soft as butter and hard as steel" and when Margaret stood before him with her request, agreed, saying "for five minutes only at 9 in the morning." Margaret wired them to this effect. They were coming direct from some professional engagement near Chicago and would be flying into Myrtle Beach.

 

Next morning at 9 promptly, Baba arrived at the Lagoon Cabin looking especially radiant and beautiful with his hair all combed out and not in the plait. He was wearing a colorful coat over his white langri. Baba waited and waited. No dancers arrived. He sent for Margaret. Why had she asked him to see anyone after the 17th? He was not in the mood for any interview now and where were they? Others were called and told the same. Baba paced up and down the Lagoon Cabin asking us what we thought had happened. Did we think they had met with an accident? How had they proposed coming? He sent us to ring up the airport. No news of their plane. This continued throughout the day. Baba went off to lunch, came back afterwards and again began pacing up and down purposely keeping the discussion entirely on the four dancers. At times, Baba seemed so annoyed they were coming, then again deeply concerned as to what had happened. By evening, when it was time for Baba to leave us he again told us to ring up the airport. No news beyond that the weather was very bad, flights cancelled, many airplanes overdue. Baba then said he would go to his house and that if the dancers did arrive we were to say he would see them at 7 in the morning for five minutes. Baba then walked to the gates and just as he went out the telephone rang again. It was the

 

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