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11

 

This natural occurrence, repeated in a similar manner every time the Avatar descends, becomes a natural law. The Avatar, in every cycle of his descent to human form, becoming a target of opposition from his native community, sets up a law also. Hardly any one of the previous Avatars was an exception to this law.

 

Meher Baba, by virtue of being the Zoroastrian-born Avatar, not only does not and would not oppose this law, but upholds it—the law which, after all, is created in consequence of the spontaneous and unrestricted outflow of his own compassion for the Zoroastrians.

 

Meher Baba's coming down to human life is essentially for the sake of the entire humankind, irrespective of class, religion or status, material or spiritual; nay, it is for the uplift of the entire living being. More fundamentally, it is for the universal awakening. The down-graded state of a certain community only acts as a spiritual stimulus or a pointer for the All-Compassionate Being to be drawn down to earth in human body.

 

The law creates opposition in the community of his birth. The Avatar gains ascendance over such opposition. It is because of His extreme compassion for the fallen community that he triumphs over the forces of opposition by trying to bring the spiritual good to the community. It is because of the law that the community turns a deaf ear to the silent voice of the Avatar. For such an act of denial, animosity and aggression against the personality of the Avatar, the community becomes a subject of retribution and suffering by being humiliated and oppressed by posterity.

 

The community is not at fault. The law takes its course. The law upholds itself and becomes instrumental in manifesting the infinite compassion and generosity of the Avatar. The forces of compassion and aggression have been from great antiquity carrying on their play of opposites in repeated crises of the material against the spiritual.

 

Out of his infinite compassion, the more Baba tries to draw near him those of his community, the more it misunderstands and agitates against him. Its oft-repeated stale versions are too illogical to be convincing. They are:

 

"Here is a lad who had just grown up as one amongst us. What wisdom can he ever give us?"

 

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