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55

 

room, her food was poisoned, a cobra was concealed to a bouquet of flowers; she accepted all as a gift of her Lord Krishna and nothing happened, he protected her. She refused to have anything to do with anyone but her Lord Krishna. Finally the king drove her away. She said, 'If the king drives me out I have a place, but if the Lord of the Universe is displeased, I have no place.’ The people turned against her. As years passed, she looked radiant in her rags. Then the king came and fell at her feet. For a man in India to bow down to a woman is a sin, and to his wife, unforgivable. Yet he fell at her feet because she was sincere. When she died all revered her, and now people repeat her bhajans."

 

“I am Krishna. I want all of you to love me as Mira loved me. Mehera's love is different and cannot be compared to that of Mira."

 

“A record will be played on which Mira sings. She uses words with a deep meaning. 'Krishna is mine, I belong to Krishna. I have nothing to do with any one.' You hear the word 'gopala' because Krishna, as a boy, looked after the cows."

 

After the record was played, Baba asked Don Stevens if he knew about St. Theresa d' Avila, and then Dr. Kenmore, who said: "She devoted her whole life to Jesus. That's all I recall, Baba." Baba replied, "That is the most important thing. She loved me; she devoted her life completely to me."

 

A record of spirituals sung by Marian Anderson was played. Baba closed finger and thumb in a circular gesture of approval. One song she sang was "He's Got The Whole World in His Hands." Baba gestured with right hand—'I've got the whole universe in my palm.' The last song on record was "Let My People Go." Baba's face became solemn, and it was very quiet in the barn. He touched his right foot and then his forehead twice.

 

From 12 to 2 p.m. Baba again gave interviews in the Lagoon Cabin. In the afternoon there was a dance performance by Margaret Craske's young group of ballet dancers. Don Stevens announced the program, saying, "Baba, your words have a deep effect on us. We know there is no yesterday and no tomorrow, and we are giving this performance for you in the Eternal Now!"

 

The first dance was "The May Apple" danced by Peter Saul and Viola Farber. Then Jean Cebrun danced "The Ambiguous Monster" as a solo, for

 

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