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5

 

When he explained his final declaration of 30th September, 1954, Baba said that when he "spoke" he used his "own language" but also "your language". I think we must remember this in everything Baba says, and not be too sure when we listen to or read him that we understand. All the same, in the words I have just quoted we can see that we should approach Baba free from attachment in our souls, look on him with our inner eye, think of him with our inner mind, give up our opinions and expect nothing. We should remember that Baba does not put himself in a position above us all: he is not the Supreme One. To be the Highest of the High, in Baba 's language. means to be the Lowest of the Low, for he demonstrates in his life that there is no lowly or humiliating or distasteful service that he does not render.

 

Baba says his object is to awaken us to our real selves; to enable us to get free from bindings and the world of illusion and enter into reality. This realization cannot be conveyed by teaching. Even physical contact will not do it. Just to sit at the feet of a Master and to listen to him is not the way. Baba tells people to do this or that, but the virtue is not in what is done but in the obedience. He may tell you to read the books published in his name or by anyone else, but the reading is not the way, only the act of obedience. If you read, provided you read sincerely, purely and without prejudice or preconceptions, even if you come to the conclusion that what you read means nothing to you, you have none the less obeyed the Master, for the obedience was what was required.

 

We cannot really talk about Baba's teaching for unless it changes our lives inwardly it does not exist for us. Outward change is useless; giving up things, doing different work, and so on, means nothing. Only being different, in other words being awake to what we really are, matters. Baba says "Love me." By this he means love God. But it is much easier to love Baba who is near than to love a God who seems remote. Said by any other man this would be absurd; said by Baba it is in fact the sweetest words one can ever wish to hear. For in saying, "Love me," Baba points to a God who is not remote: he points within.

 

The words are sweet, but it is no simple thing to love Baba, for it means to give up self-love, the love of the false self, the love of our loved personality and its rights, from which spring hatred, jealousies, touchiness, vanity, pride and all other evils whatsoever. We can know everything there is to

 

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