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poems vitally concern all those who love poetry for its own sake and also those who cherish it for its interpretative power and prophetic approach to the mysteries of life. On the physical plane, his title poem refers to the bright stars that adorn the southern sky; metaphysically, these stars typify the Planes that the seeker must eventually find are in the domain of duality and illusion and which must be blotted out when man becomes unified with Divine Reality.

 

The dedication refers to the One Who "draws a line in the shape of a heart around space, and suffers the limitation of form in order that the devotees may know Him." The poems follow the high tradition of Blake and Yeats in that their symbolic language draws its power from divinely revealed Truth. The ten sections of the volume include "Music of Earth," "Dawn Through to Sunrise," "The Stone Masons," and "Child Songs." Together with the others, they present the poet's conception of a new day and a new humanity, an upsurge of spiritual life as it has been revealed to the world by an Avatar.

 

Whether you read Francis Brabazon's poems as fine examples of the newer, more subtle poetic forms, or as poesy inspired by a Master that leads to a closer relationship with God, they are moving and illuminating. Some modern poetry is complex and difficult of immediate comprehension. The poems of "7 Stars to Morning" are profound, but at the same time, lucid and exact of phrase, and reveal a most sensitive use of language. They may be classified as "organic poetry" in the sense that the poems have an organic life of their own within a multi-dimensional structure and bring instant images to the reader's mind.

 

Mr. Brabazon has stated, in the single prose section "Art as Practice of Devotion," that "art is a method of practicing devotion to the True Teacher, Who is the supreme Artist; the whole universe being His creation and man His most finished work." Again, that pure creativeness achieved as a means of revealing love for others becomes a "vehicle for their emancipation," and that man must perceive that his works have no real existence except in God.

 

As a whole, the poems of this distinguished collection record the illumination of the human mind and the extension of human vision into eternal Truth because of contact with the Master. They will pour a reviving leaven into modern poetic art.

 

Jeanne Robert Foster

 

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