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3

 

morning from ten to twelve and every afternoon from four to six. I carried out these instructions to the minute, aided by the church bells.

 

For ten days I cried. I neither knew whether I ate or whether I slept, I only thought of the moment when I could return to the garden. Sometimes I did not see Baba. One time he led me to the wall and pointing to the sea far below, said on his board, "I am like the sea, drown yourself in me and you will live forever."

 

After Italy I saw Baba every time he came to Europe and was so happy when he made use of my apartment in Paris to see those who wished to see him there. When my daughter went in to see Baba, I said, "Baba dear, this is my baby." My daughter immediately said, "Baba, she is much more of a baby than I am," and then Baba said on his board, "Baba also means baby, so we are three babies." He is always ready with such adorable things to say, and makes one feel so happy and at ease.

 

Those meeting Baba for the first time always wonder what they ought to say and how they ought to act. This is all useless, for the minute one comes into the presence of Baba, the answer to what one should do or say is all there. Everything is there.

 

I went to London with Baba, and another time to America and on to Hollywood. The train to California makes one stop of one-half hour at Albuquerque, New Mexico. Baba got off the train and walked up and down the long brick platform. I was with him. He wrote something on the palm of his hand—"Indian." I thought, what shall I do, Baba wants to see some Indians and where shall I find any? I pointed to an old squaw sitting in front of one of the shops that border the station. Baba motioned to his four Indian disciples, pulled my arm through his and off we went toward the end of the long station platform. He turned abruptly and continued up a street as if he knew exactly where he was going. At that time I had not arrived at the state of mind which leaves everything to Baba. I was still thinking for myself and I thought—my, we have only half an hour here and where is Baba going, hunting for Indians, we may miss the train . . . Baba, of course, knew what I was thinking. After walking about two blocks I saw two Indians standing at the corner. One was very tall and fat, dressed in shirt and trousers and a band of red tied around his forehead. The other one was short, and was selling small bows and arrows. I was delighted and said to Baba, "Here are two Indians."

 

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