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32

 

outstanding instance being the presence, for the first time, of this special group at Baba's great public darshan held September 12, 1954, in the park at Ahmednagar. As for the Western group, Baba has been gradually putting them back into the world at large in two's and three's to live "the New Life," as he showed it to us.

 

Our Work in Meherabad Ashram

 

In our group were five Americans, one Swiss girl ( Irene Billo), myself and later Margaret Craske from England, plus the six Easterners already in the ashram. After we had become acclimatized to our new surroundings, Baba set us to work, giving to each their special duties. No one was idle.

 

Whatever your work, Baba never ceased to impress upon you that all work was his work, whether done personally for him or for the benefit of all. Baba planned that both groups, Eastern and Western, should work together in the household, the garden or the newly built hospital for poor women of the district. Knowledge and experience possessed by one must be contributed for the benefit of the community, a true communal life in which all shared. There was among us an exchange of lessons in Indian and European languages, a course in typing and shorthand, opportunities to study art, dancing and music. Norina, Nonny and Elizabeth were kept busy editing the Meher Baba Journal, and a number of us had to contribute an article suggested by Baba, "Our Impressions," as we named the series.

 

It was Baba who decided what our work or study should be, for he always had a purpose behind what he asked us to do. In all we undertook Baba was ever-watchful to see we did not become attached to the work or its results, and at any moment, he would stop a particular activity when it had served its purpose. As it turned out, we rarely achieved much for we were constantly on the move, and this put an end to many pursuits, but we certainly were kept occupied.

 

Baba gave us a peep into the daily life of the native villager; we learned to grind wheat on a hand-turned grinder, two at a time, sitting cross-legged on the floor, chanting Indian folk songs; to pick over rice, lentils and other grains used for Indian bread as they

 

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