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45

 

Another saying during these weeks was "I would suffer millions of deaths to make someone love our Beloved God, Who alone is worthy of real love —our love." The widely different outlook of this lad and that of the other one who realized Baba's Infinite nature, indicates how widely He spreads His net of Love.

 

As a voice chanted from within our bus as we sped through the soft Indian night to Meherabad and Baba:

 

“This Love is not easy. It is an Infinite Ocean of Fire, and we have to swim through it."

 

 

Baba's Visit to Arangaon Village

September 24, 1954

 

As we descended the Hill with Baba, groups of villagers could be seen under the trees and near the dhuni fire, ready to go to their village, Arangaon, with Him.

 

Baba welcomed us in the Hall and then called an Indian devotee who, seated before Him on the floor, chanted fervently about the love for the Divine Beloved, one of those age-old sacred songs of India, himself gazing lovingly in the face of Baba who was bending forward slightly unapt in response. Then we followed Him, with our hearts thus kindled afresh, to the dhuni fire, which He lit, and the perfume and flame of the burning sandalwood rose amidst the cries of "Avatar Meher Baba, ki-jai "—the deep voices of the Mandali swelling the chorus of the assembled villagers. Primitive music of clashing sticks, drums, bells and horns added a haunting rhythm to the Master's Presence, now seated and garlanded before the dhuni.

 

With that unique grace so natural to Himself, Baba moved forward and lifted onto the raised platform a tiny, naked, shy little boy, caressing him until the little fellow broke out into smiles, reflecting the happiness of all during the whole journey. Soon Baba turned His step toward the village, led by the band and a group of male dancers in two lines facing each other. leaping from right to left, into each other's place and back again, they skillfully sustained the rhythm while progressing sideways; we who followed could observe, unbroken, two lines of dancers forming and reforming while they looked sideways at Baba, in whose honor this traditional primi­tive dance was given.

 

As the crowd gathered from the village ahead, we could distinguish many

 

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