Previous Page
Table Of Contents
Next Page

 

 68

 

with Baba leading us into the quarters of the untouchables, and finally to the houses occupied by some of the families of the Mandali, where cocoanuts were broken at His feet, darshan was given, and more garlands were placed around His neck.

 

At one point, referring to the untouchables, Baba remarked, "These poor people are ordinarily not allowed to move among the rest of society," to which Joseph Harb replied, "Well, it seems to me as if they were now moving in the best of society," meaning Baba's company, of course.

 

Everywhere we moved, in spite of Baba's preoccupation with these deeply devoted villagers, His continuous solicitude for the welfare of the Western group was constantly made manifest. He would stop every once in a while to be sure that we were all close to Him. We were reminded to watch our heads while entering low doorways; we were not to stumble over piles of stones, or water-drains; and once Baba ordered a boy to stand on a tree-stump in the middle of the read so that we should not trip over it. There was no limit to His love or His solicitude, nor of His ability freely to express them.

 

At about six o'clock, Baba ordered us back to the men's ashram to wait for Him, while He went to visit the patients in a tuberculosis hospital nearby. When He returned, He gathered us about Him in the large hall and ordered us each to take two tablets of Anacin and quinine before retiring, as a precaution against malaria, some cases of which, He said, had arisen in the village. Then He gave us each what He said would have to be His last personal embrace, as from that time He would be unable to see us privately again. It was the crowning moment of what will always be a gloriously memorable day.

 

 

Sunday, September 26

 

Baba decided several days ago to give darshan to those of Ahmednagar and the vicinity who had not been able to be present at the large darshan gathering of the 12th. A platform and a seat were accordingly erected in the patio of the Khushroo Quarters, where Adi Irani lives and where Meher Publication Office is, and alongside of which the Sarosh Motor Works is located. We were ordered to be present at 3:30 p.m., when the programme was scheduled to begin.

 

Previous Page
Table Of Contents
Next Page