Previous Page
Table Of Contents
Next Page

 

 41

 

images of the outside world." The other young Australian said, "I had a feeling that there was no ventilation when the door was closed. I felt nothing."

 

Baba asked if they would do it every night for seven nights. They said, "Yes." "Do not be frightened," said Baba, "there is nothing to fear. Don't force your attention; keep awake and don't move. Even if a snake comes, let it pass by. And love Baba during these half hours. Fear means no love. Think of Baba from the bottom of your hearts; after seven nights you will see Baba. Why this fear, Francis? Francis of Assisi and Francis Xavier loved Christ with all their might, and what they suffered none of you can guess; but fear was foreign to them. Do not fear, love me. Don't be bothered; think of Baba; be happy. So from tonight, Francis, see that they sit there and close the door."

 

Just then a boy comes in with an envelope. Baba takes the envelope and tells him to go. The boy obeys literally.

 

He went on to say, "Francis, you sell all and follow the Cross. I am in a peculiar mood. We will have a vague talk, moving from one subject to another. I seldom sleep till after 3 o'clock in the morning. When I am in seclusion, the night watchman is called every few minutes until then. When do you all go to sleep? At ten. Don't let the two young men sit tonight, as you have to be up so early, but from tomorrow." Baba gives Ludwig tablets to enable him to sleep: they were what the boy had brought.

 

"You asked about planes," He said to Malcolm. "Planes mean what? Malcolm answers, "States of consciousness." Baba replied, "This present state of yours is gross consciousness; the gross senses are used, and you have the gross experiences of eating, drinking, and moving about. This is the gross world; it is not the gross plane. Although the consciousness is gross, it is not the gross plane. Manzil means destination or goal; Muqam means place of stay or state. You must differentiate. You are in the gross manzil and there are innumerable muqam states. Meherabad is a muqam where you experience with the gross senses. When you are in America, France, England, the manzil is the same—gross—but the muqam is different, and you have different experiences of the gross world in each place. If a man in Arangaon, who seldom even visits Ahmednagar, were blindfolded, put in a plane, and set down on Broadway in the night, his experiences would be fantastic to him because of the different muqam, but it would be the same manzil.

 

Previous Page
Table Of Contents
Next Page