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The author performs an important service by clarifying the difference between formal religion—tradition, dogma, morality—versus essential religion—spirit, metaphysics, mysticism, and internal Truth. He points out that the unity of traditional religions is realized only in a purely inward or spiritual way and cannot be realized on the external level.

 

Among the great monotheistic religions, new revelations justifiably depreciated traditional values, without losing their transcendent unity. Thus the schism between the Latin and Greek Churches; the rejection of Judaism by Christianity, and of Hinduism by Buddhism, are contingencies which do not affect the intrinsic and essential reality of these religions. An example of transcendent unity is of the two divine aspects of justice and mercy in Abrahamic monotheism which became in the tradition of Moses, the 'letter,' in Christianity, the 'spirit,' and in Islam, the differentiated equilibrium of these two aspects of revelation.

 

The author's claim to "intellectual intuition" (Spinoza's "amor dei intellectualis") as contrasted with philosophic reasoning, is substantiated by the work. In this volume, Schuon tackles a complicated subject and stays with it, revealing many new insights. Mr. Schuon's books have been endorsed by the late Ananda Coomaraswamy as authentic interpretations of Oriental doctrines. Mr. Townsend has done an excellent translation from the French, taking into consideration the difficult subject-matter, style and diction which makes this book one for the discerning initiate.

—DANA FIELD

 

 

Education and the Significance of Life, by Krishnamurti, Harper Bros., $1.50

 

Unless war is the end of life, our education has failed utterly, reasons Krishnamurti, for our modern schools have produced more efficient products to conform to more ruthless competition and destruction. Education, even as Thoreau had warned us about our whole culture, has become "an improved means to an unimproved end."

 

Educators, mindful of the failure of our education, have been constantly trying new methods. Krishnamurti points out that these earnest attempts have not worked, for to seek reform in system or idea, outside ourselves, is to fail, is to escape ourselves.

 

Therefore, not means, but end, becomes the significant question in education. In penetrating to the purpose of education, many educators have used just about the same phrasing as Krishnamurti: "The function of

 

 

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