Previous Page
Table Of Contents
Next Page

 

27

 

itself, without any reference to the Infinite Spirit, of which it is the expression. The God-man realizes the truth. He is conscious of the true nature of God, as well as the true nature of creation, and yet this does not involve for him any consciousness of duality, because for him, creation does not exist as anything but the changing shadow of God, who is the only eternal and real existence, and who is at the heart of creation. The God-man can, therefore, remain conscious of creation without involving himself in any deficit of God-consciousness; and he continues to work in the world of forms for the furtherance of the primary purpose of creation, which is to create full Self-knowledge or God-realization in every soul.

 

When the God-man descends into the world of forms from the impersonal aspect of God, he gets the universal mind; and he knows, feels and works through this universal mind. No longer for him is the limited life of finite mind; no longer for him are the pains and the pleasures of duality; no longer for him is the emptiness and the vanity of the separative ego. He is consciously one with all life. Through his universal mind, he not only experiences the happiness of all minds but also their suffering: and since due to ignorance, most minds have a great preponderance of suffering over happiness, the suffering which thus comes to the God-man because of the condition of others, is infinitely greater than the happiness. The suffering of the God-man is great; but the infinite bliss of the God-state, which he constantly and effortlessly enjoys, supports him in all the suffering which comes to him, with the result that he remains unmoved and unaffected by it.

 

The individualized soul has no access to the infinite bliss of the God-state; and he is seriously moved and affected by his sanskaric happiness and suffering because of his ignorant identification with the limited mind. But the God-man does not identify himself even with the universal mind, which he gets while coming down for the world. He has taken the universal mind only for his mission in the world; and since he merely uses it for his work without self-identification with it, he remains unaffected by the suffering or the happiness which come to him through it. He drops the universal mind after his work is done; but, even when he is working in the world, through his universal mind, he knows himself to be the eternal and only God, and not the universal mind.

 

The Union which the God-man has with God is perfect: and even when

 

Previous Page
Table Of Contents
Next Page