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18

 

hospitable shores of India. The modern Parsis of India are the descendants of those early settlers.

 

"You shall therefore hearken to the Soul of Nature." Thus taught Zoroaster 3500 years ago. Nature was his temple of worship. He looked around and wondered and admired all the grand objects and phenomena of Nature, and raised his hands and praised and thanked the One who created these. He looked from nature up to natures God. He found "tongues in trees, books in running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything."

 

But notice Zoroaster does not say simply "Nature," but the "Soul of Nature." For the Soul—the Center—the very heart of all things, is Divine. That's where man meets God face to face, and the whole creation. It is the golden link that unites the whole world in the Fatherhood of God and the Brotherhood of Man—a Divine Unity in the midst of material differences.

 

According to Zoroaster, the mystic symbol of Fire signifies: (1) Purity. It purifies everything, which Dante calls "Refining," and Carlyle, "Fire-baptism." This virtue is the keyboard of his teachings and philosophy; and the way to heaven is through pure thoughts, pure words and pure deeds alone. (2) Elevating effect... suggested by the upward-soaring flame. It is better to look up than to look down. (3) Unity. The separate flames coalesce into one broad soaring flame, in the shape of a triangle, suggesting "Matter is many, but Spirit is one,"—a Divine Unity in the midst of material differences; "Ye in Me, and I in You, " the Universal Brotherhood. (4) Life The triangle of the Fire of Zoroaster is formed of Life, Light and Love, at its points. J. S. Mill says: "Life is no brief candle to me. It is a sort of splendid torch which I have got hold of for a moment; I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations." (5) Humility. "As this fire once bright, cheerful and fragrant is at last reduced to dust, so let me do my best to spread, before my death, the fragrance of good deeds and charity, and lead the light of righteousness and knowledge to others." (6) Something Divine. When Zoroaster, looking into the sacred flames, uttered these fateful words: "Contemplate the Beams of Fire with a most pious mind," he must have seen in them Something visibly realizable of the Deity in those sacred flames. It is that Something that makes one turn towards the Fire, the Sun, the Moon, the Stars when one worships them and offers them their heartfelt prayers. It is that which all human souls, never so bedarkened, love; the prime cheerer, that ethereal First of things, quin-

 

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