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7

 

But the easiest and safest way to lose one's "self" is by completely sur­rendering to the Perfect Master. The past, present and future of the one who has surrendered are drowned in the Master, and he is no longer either bound by or responsible for any of his actions, whether good or bad, expressed during his implicit obedience to the Master.

 

Thus, Complete Surrenderance to the Perfect Master is, in itself, Freedom.

 

 

9

 

ON THE SEVENFOLD VEIL

 

Kabir was a poet as well as a Perfect Master. "Kabirwani," his book of poems, is therefore all the more unique because of his lucid expositions on God, love for God, the Divine Path and the Illusory Creation. Being a Perfect Master, Kabir has said things as much for the man in the street as for the initiate. He does not hesitate to disclose, both allegorically as well as in plain words, some of the spiritual secrets, which, though within the grasp of ordinary man, are yet known only to the spiritually illumined ones, who alone truly understand the deeper meaning underlying most of his sayings.

 

There are Yogis (those who practice a systematic course of esoteric knowledge) who can of themselves suspend their physical bodies in mid-air during the time they are in a temporary samadhi (trance). There are some who can bodily walk on water or fly in the air without the aid of external means, and yet all this is no signor proof of their having experienced Divine Love. Weighed with spiritual scales, these miracles have no value whatsoever. In fact, miracle-mongering by the average yogi is not only poles apart from the Spiritual Path, but is actually a hindrance to the individual's evolution toward spiritual progress. The following incident in the life of a Hindu Master shows the disregard in which Perfect Masters, who are Truth personified, hold them:

 

The Master was one day by the river's edge waiting for one of the little ferry boats that takes passengers across for the diminutive fare of one anna (less than a cent). A yogi, seeing him thus waiting, came up to him, literally walked across the river and back, and said, "That was much easier,

 

 

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