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34

 

by revealing the Truth. In the absence of the perception of the Truth, the mind is likely to imagine all kinds of things. For example, the soul can imagine that he is a beggar or a king, a man or a woman, etc. The soul thus goes on gathering the experiences of the opposites. Wherever there is duality, there is a tendency to restore balance through the opposite. For example, if a person has the experience of being a murderer, it has to be counter-balanced by the experience of being murdered; and if the soul has the experience of being a king, it has to be counter-balanced by the experience of being a beggar.

 

Thus the soul may wander ad infinitum from one opposite to the other without being able to put an end to his false consciousness. The Sadguru can help him to arrive at the Truth by giving him perception of the Truth and cutting short the working of his imagination which would otherwise be endless. The Sadguru helps the soul in bondage by sowing in him the seed of God-realization, but it always takes some time for the latter to attain God-realization. Every process of growth in the universe takes TIME.

 

(A) The Over-Soul:

 

“Over-soul” is the English equivalent of the Sanskrit term “Paramatman,’ which means “God, whose cosmic and universal life embraces all things.”

 

(B) The Mental Body:

 

The Mental body is often called Karana Sharira, or the causal body, because it stores within itself the seeds or the causes of all the desires. The mind retains all impressions and dispositions (i.e., sanskaras) in a latent form. The limited I or the ego is composed of sanskaras. However, the actual manifestation of sanskaras in consciousness (i.e., the different mental processes) takes place in the subtle body.

 

(C) THE GROSS, SUBTLE AND MENTAL WORLDS:

 

Nature is much bigger than what a man can perceive through the ordinary senses of his physical body. The hidden aspects of Nature consist of finer matter and forces. There is no unbridgeable gulf separating the finer aspects of Nature from its gross aspect. They all interpenetrate one another and exist together. The finer aspects of Nature are not perceptible to man, but

 

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